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TTB NEWSLETTER | Weekly News

October 26, 2018


IN THIS ISSUE

Greetings! This week’s top news includes the publication of our latest strategic plan, a reminder for breweries that use wine or spirits barrels for aging beer, an announcement about our next malt beverage formula webinar, and three recent field enforcement actions.

NEW TTB STRATEGIC PLAN PUBLISHED

We are pleased to share the TTB Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2018 – 2022.  Our new strategic plan reflects our updated mission, vision, and values, as well as our latest strategic goals, which break down our mission and vision into operational terms and represent the main focus areas of our high-level five-year strategic vision.

  • GOAL 1: Business Qualification
  • GOAL 2: Labeling Modernization
  • GOAL 3: Tax Compliance
  • GOAL 4: Cross-Border Tax Risk
  • GOAL 5: Training Revitalization

We encourage you to take the time to review the plan, as it lays out our goals for the next five years and the strategies that we will employ to achieve them.

TTB Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2018 – 2022

REMINDER FOR BREWERIES THAT AGE BEER IN USED WINE OR SPIRITS BARRELS

Does your brewery age a product in barrels that were previously used in the production or storage of wine or distilled spirits?  If so, TTB reminds you that such barrels must not contain any discernible quantity of distilled spirits or wine.  If you use barrels that do contain spirits or wine, you could face possible tax, labeling, and product integrity issues. For further information, see TTB Ruling 2015-1.

TTB WEBINAR: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SUBMITTING MALT BEVERAGE FORMULAS

This webinar will cover the most important aspects of malt beverage formulas.

Date: Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Time: 1 - 2 p.m. ET

Topics include:

  • How to submit a malt beverage formula to TTB
  • Reasons why a formula is required for certain malt beverages
  • How to determine if your malt beverage requires a formula
  • Common reasons we have to return malt beverage formulas for correction

Spaces are filling up fast, so please Register Here.

We look forward to hearing from you,

Your TTB Formula Team

TTB TRADE PRACTICE INVESTIGATION RESULTS IN PERMIT SUSPENSION

On October 19, 2018, James Johnson Vineyards, a wholesaler in Napa, California, served a one day suspension of its basic permit.  This is the second stipulated suspension of a Federal Alcohol Administration Act (FAA) basic permit to develop out of the joint operation that TTB conducted with the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control in March 2018.

Specifically, between October 2016 and February 2018, James Johnson Vineyards, engaged in consignment sales of wine to a trade buyer that was not obligated to pay for the wine until after it had been sold to retailers.  Consignment sales arrangements, like other unlawful trade practices, are used to gain an unfair advantage over law-abiding industry members and ultimately limit consumer choice.

Additionally, the investigation revealed that James Johnson Vineyards had changed premises address in 2012 without applying for an amended basic permit, despite having notified TTB of prior address changes in 2003 and 2005.

Relevant documents related to this suspension can be found on our Field Operations Administrative Cases page.

Read the press release.

TTB ACCEPTS OFFERS IN COMPROMISE FROM FIREARMS MANUFACTURER AND DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANT PROPRIETOR

We recently accepted a $750,000 offer in compromise from TDJ, Inc., dba Christensen Arms, for allegedly failing to pay the correct rate of excise tax on firearms manufactured and for allegedly failing to file quarterly returns and make required semi-monthly deposits.  For more details, see the offer in compromise.

We also accepted a $25,000 offer in compromise from Terressentia Corporation, a distilled spirits plant, for allegedly making false and misleading blending-related label claims.  Terressentia Corporation has surrendered all related formulas and COLAs.  See the offer in compromise for details.

Titles 26 and 27 of the United States Code contain provisions for the compromise of certain civil and criminal cases. In this context, a compromise is an agreement made between the Government and an alleged violator in lieu of civil proceedings or criminal prosecution.

 

 

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